World War II weapon antidote could treat Parkinson’s

News

Author: Simge Eva DoganPublished: 12 December 2018

Parkinson's LifePrep: Parkinson's LifeCook: Parkinson's LifeServes:

World War II

Researchers at Purdue University, US, are studying a World War II chemical weapon antidote that they believe could be used to treat Parkinson’s.

It is believed the antidote, called dimercaprol, may be able to remove acrolein – a toxin that poisons neurons and can lead to the development of Parkinson’s disease.

In addition to this, researchers believe dimercaprol can increase the survival rate of brain cells, improve mobility and reduce symptoms of pain.

Riyi Shi, professor of neuroscience and biomedical engineering at Purdue University, said: “Our studies show that by removing the toxin (acrolein) from the brain, we are not just reducing the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease but also significantly reversing the damage of Parkinson’s disease. This could actually provide a new treatment for Parkinson’s patients.”

To read more on this topic click here.

For more information on the latest Parkinson’s research please visit the EPDA website


Read more:

Repurposed cancer drug shows promise for Parkinson’s

Research survey assesses impact of holidays on Parkinson’s symptoms

Go Back

Share this story

Comments


Related articles


Melissa McConaghy

Interviews

Insight into Parkinson’s: “join us as we make history”

We talk to the founder of the ‘Insight into Parkinson’s’ summit

READ MORE
Kimchi Korean food

Recipes & Nutrition

Parkinson’s power foods: one-day menus to nourish your brain and body

One-day menu ideas to enrich the microbiome to reduce symptoms

READ MORE
Kieran-Breen-Special-Report

Special reports

The future generation of advanced therapies for Parkinson’s

Dr Kieran Breen explores the potential of stem cell & gene therapies

READ MORE