Could a transplant lower the risk of Parkinson’s?

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Author: Simge Eva DoganPublished: 14 March 2019

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Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine, US, have found that having a heart, kidney, lung or bone marrow transplant could reduce the risk of developing Parkinson’s.

As part of the study, published in medical journal ‘Parkinsonism & Related Disorders’, the team assessed data of just under 200,000 patients – 89,790 of whom had Parkinson’s.

The results revealed that individuals who had a transplant were 37% less likely to develop Parkinson’s. This could be due to the immunosuppressant medication patients receive before undergoing a transplant, which researchers believe may help slow neurodegeneration as it reduces inflammation in the brain.

The study said: “This study provides evidence that tissue transplant may be associated with a lower PD [Parkinson’s disease] risk, warranting further investigation to identify factors that mediate this relationship.” 

To read more on this topic click here.

For more information on the latest Parkinson’s research please visit the EPDA website.


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