New tool could support “faster diagnosis” of Parkinson’s disease psychosis

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Author: Saskia MairPublished: 24 September 2020

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A new screening tool has been developed to support the early diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease psychosis – a symptom of the condition that is often misdiagnosed.

Created by Canadian senior care software company, PointClickCare and membership organisation, the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP), the platform asks questions on topics like hallucinations and delusions. Healthcare workers can then review the responses and decide to collect more information and create a care plan. Data collected through the tool will also be used to help scientific research in healthcare organisations.

Bill Stuart, clinical product strategist at PointClickCare said: “Not only will the screener tool better enable faster diagnosis, it will provide the senior care industry with a consistent way of approaching Parkinson’s psychosis.”

Chad Worz, chief executive of ASCP, added: “We are excited to have another tool for care teams to facilitate a more standardised care process for Parkinson’s disease and we are excited for the role that pharmacists play in this process.”


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