Study suggests telemedicine “as effective as in-person care” for Parkinson’s

News

Author: Parkinson's Life editorsPublished: 6 September 2017

Parkinson's LifePrep: Parkinson's LifeCook: Parkinson's LifeServes:

Telemedicine

A study, published in the journal ‘Neurology’, has found evidence to suggest that telemedicine is just as effective as in-person care for Parkinson’s disease.

Researchers found that telemedicine – the ‘virtual’ diagnosis and treatment of individuals through telecommunication technology – can deliver high quality care for those who do not have access to a neurologist.

Ray Dorsey, professor of neurology at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York State, US, and lead author of the study said: “We now have the ability to reach anyone, anywhere, but the promise and benefits of telemedicine will not be fully realised until the changes are made in medicare policy.”

The study – which is the first national randomised controlled clinical trial of telemedicine for Parkinson’s disease – was conducted as part of the Connect.Parkinson project, an initiative led by the University of Rochester Medical Center, in collaboration with several other Parkinson’s institutions, including The Michael J Fox Foundation.

Go Back

Share this story

Comments


Related articles


A pensive man looks out a window

Special reports

Parkinson’s disease and loneliness: “people are hungry for some connection”

Dr Indu Subramanian on the how and why of staying socially connected

READ MORE
Jimmy Choi American Ninja Warrior lead

Perspectives

Michael J Fox records special message for “inspirational” Parkinson’s athlete

The ‘Back to the Future’ actor recorded a message for a TV show contest

READ MORE
Carol Walton lead

Interviews

“We want the world to walk with us,” says Parkinson’s Unity Walk leader

2016 Parkinson’s Unity Walk hopes to raise more than US$1.7m

READ MORE