Scientists at MIT uncover new clues about Parkinson’s disease

News

Author: Simge Eva DoganPublished: 22 October 2020

Parkinson's LifePrep: Parkinson's LifeCook: Parkinson's LifeServes:

three scientists talking in laboratory

Neuroscientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), US, have developed new tools that could improve understanding of Parkinson’s disease.

As part of a study, published in Science Advances, the tools were used on animals to investigate the relationship between two types of signals that are disrupted in Parkinson’s – dopamine signalling and beta-band oscillations (coordinated waves of electrical activity in the brain).

The scientists found that while the animals performed certain tasks, beta-band oscillations increased while dopamine signalling declined in particular parts of the brain. Factors including an animal’s past experience and the reward value of a task also impacted the relationship between the two signals.

Helen Schwerdt, a research scientist at MIT, said: “Considering electrical signals side by side with chemical signals is really important to understand how the brain works.”

Ann Graybiel, a professor at MIT, added: “As these methods in neuroscience become more and more precise and dazzling in their power, we’re bound to discover new things.”


Read more:

People with Parkinson’s disease have a higher risk of dying from Covid-19, study finds

BIAL enters the US and acquires “promising” Parkinson’s disease programmes

Go Back

Share this story

Comments


Related articles


Parkies Beer

Europe

Raise your glass to ‘Parkies’ – the new beer that’s raising funds for nurses

Ex-Pink Floyd tour manager launches own ‘Parkies’ beer

READ MORE
Elisabeth Ildal

Global update

Insight into Parkinson’s: “I thought it was an old man’s shaky disease”

We talk to speakers at ‘Insight into Parkinson’s’

READ MORE
story

Global update

A chance to tell your story to the world

Submissions for the competition are open

READ MORE