Researchers discover brain network linked to chronic pain in Parkinson’s

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Author: Simge Eva DoganPublished: 5 September 2018

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Researchers at a French university claim to have discovered the brain network linked to pain in Parkinson’s – called the subthalamic nucleus. People with Parkinson’s who have been treated with deep brain stimulation in this part of the brain have reported reduced symptoms of pain.

In a study – published in the science journal eLife – the researchers used electrical signals to stimulate the subthalamic nucleus of rats. They found that healthy rats showed signs of discomfort faster than rats with a damaged subthalamic nucleus. The results also identified the brain pathway through which pain signals travel.

Veronique Coizet, senior author of the study, said: “Further experiments are now needed to fully characterise the effects (of) deep brain stimulation on this brain region in our experimental models, with a view to finding ways to optimise it as a treatment for pain caused by Parkinson’s and other neurological diseases.”

The researchers hope that by stimulating this part of the brain, they can develop an effective pain reliever for people living with Parkinson’s.

To read more on this topic click here.

For more information on the types of Parkinson’s pain please visit the EPDA website.

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