Researchers develop light-activated Parkinson’s drug

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Author: Simge Eva DoganPublished: 18 July 2018

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light-activated

A new light-activated drug for treating Parkinson’s has been developed by a research team led by the University of Barcelona, Spain.

The drug – named MRS7145 – is placed within a brain implant and then activated by shining a light on it.

The effect of the newly developed drug was tested on live mice to see if it could improve their motor function. The results – published in ‘Journal of Controlled Release’ – showed that MRS7145 reduced tremors and seizures and improved the mice’s ability to walk.

Professor Francisco Ciruela, researcher at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the University of Barcelona, Spain, said he envisaged the drug being administered by smart phones, with “the doctor (controlling) in a precise manner the release of the most efficient dose of the active drug in the place of action”.

For more information on Parkinson’s research please visit the EPDA website.

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