Researchers create Parkinson’s-resistant stem cells

News

Author: Simge Eva DoganPublished: 2 January 2019

Parkinson's LifePrep: Parkinson's LifeCook: Parkinson's LifeServes:

Stem cells

Scientists at the University of Edinburgh, UK, have created stem cells that they say are resistant to developing Parkinson’s.

The study – published in science journal ‘European Journal of Neuroscience’ – used gene editing techniques to remove the alpha-synuclein protein from the stem cells. To test the resistance of the new stem cells, researchers treated both edited and unedited stem cells with a chemical agent that induced Lewy bodies – abnormal proteins that lead to neurodegeneration.

The results showed that the gene-edited cells did not develop signs of Parkinson’s, whereas the unedited cells did.

Dr Tilo Kunath – who led the study – said: “We know that Parkinson’s disease spreads from neuron-neuron, invading healthy cells. This could essentially put a shelf life on the potential of cell replacement therapy. Our exciting discovery has the potential to considerably improve these emerging treatments.”

To read more on this topic click here.

For more information on Parkinson’s and stem cell therapy please visit the EPDA website.


Read more:

Memory loss could be an indication of Parkinson’s 

World War II weapon antidote could treat Parkinson’s

Go Back

Share this story

Comments


Related articles


Interviews

Charity Miles: the app “changing the way you see the world”

We talk to the founder of the Charity Miles app

READ MORE

Resources & Tools

Free online tool allows you to track Parkinson’s symptoms

Map out the frequency of motor and non-motor Parkinson’s symptoms

READ MORE
Parkinson's in the news

Global update

Parkinson’s in the news: March

A roundup of Parkinson’s news stories in March

READ MORE