Repurposed cancer drug shows promise for Parkinson’s

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Author: Simge Eva DoganPublished: 5 December 2018

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Researchers at the Oxford Parkinson’s Disease Centre, UK, have repurposed an experimental cancer drug – called tasquinimod – as a potential treatment for Parkinson’s.

The study – funded by Parkinson’s UK and published in science journal ‘Cell Stem Cell’ – has been tested on a total of 10 patients so far.

As part of the research, the study grew brain cells from donated skin cell samples of people living with a rare genetic form of Parkinson’s – this process was then repeated on people with a common non-genetic form of the condition. Researchers found that tasquinimod can block HDAC4, a protein that causes Parkinson’s genes to become inactive.

Professor Richard Wade-Martins, co-lead author of the study, said: “We think that switching off these genes in brain cells may play a vital role in the cell damage and death that occurs in Parkinson’s.”

To read more on this topic click here.

For more information on the latest Parkinson’s research please visit Parkinson’s Europe website.


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