Queen Elizabeth II honours UK university for Parkinson’s research

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Author: Roisin McCormackPublished: 5 December 2019

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Queen Elizabeth II visiting a research centre

A neuroscience research centre at the University of Sheffield, UK, has been recognised by Queen Elizabeth II for improving the lives of patients living with neurodegenerative conditions, including Parkinson’s.

The Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience, which is based at the university, uses emerging developments in neuroscience to create innovative new approaches to treating brain conditions.

The prestigious Queen’s Anniversary Prize was awarded at St James’s Palace, London. The institute was commended for its development of Parkinson’s drug discovery programmes.

The honour is awarded to UK universities who exhibit groundbreaking and innovative approaches to research – with beneficial results at local, national and global levels. 

Professor Koen Lamberts, president and vice-chancellor for the University of Sheffield, said: “As well as making life-changing discoveries today, The Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience is nurturing the next generation of talented neuroscience students, whose research will lead to pioneering treatments for those living with neurological diseases.”


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