Plant-based compounds could treat chronic pain in Parkinson’s, study finds

News

Author: Sophie BatesPublished: 12 March 2020

Parkinson's LifePrep: Parkinson's LifeCook: Parkinson's LifeServes:

A six-year study has found that chronic pain in people with Parkinson’s is linked to a gene involved with how the brain responds to cannabis compounds.  

The investigation examined why some people with the condition experience persistent pain – and the impact it has on their work, daily life and social relationships. Conducted by researchers at Manchester’s Salford Royal Foundation Trust, UK, and funded by Parkinson’s UK, it is the largest study to investigate chronic pain in people with Parkinson’s.

Dr Monty Silverdale, consultant neurologist at Greater Manchester Centre, said: “This study is significant because it shows the important role of genetics in chronic pain in Parkinson’s.

“Our findings suggest that cannabis-based compounds may be worth investigating as a treatment for pain in Parkinson’s.”


Read more: 

 Could playing table tennis help reduce Parkinson’s symptoms?

‘Dopamine-boosting’ BT13 molecule could be used to slow Parkinson’s

Go Back

Share this story

Comments


Related articles


My PD Journey

Europe

My PD Journey: landmark Parkinson’s summit highlights urgent need for new composite scale

European coalition set to roll out new and simple composite scale

READ MORE
Emotions of PD

Interviews

Frozen faces: 15 icy images that show what it’s like to lose control of your expressions

Unmasking the emotions of Parkinson’s

READ MORE
Brussels Sprout Mousse lead

Recipes & Nutrition

Mousse of Brussels sprouts and onions topped with nutmeg

An exciting take on the iron-rich vegetable Brussels Sprouts

READ MORE