Plant-based compounds could treat chronic pain in Parkinson’s, study finds

News

Author: Sophie BatesPublished: 12 March 2020

Parkinson's LifePrep: Parkinson's LifeCook: Parkinson's LifeServes:

A six-year study has found that chronic pain in people with Parkinson’s is linked to a gene involved with how the brain responds to cannabis compounds.  

The investigation examined why some people with the condition experience persistent pain – and the impact it has on their work, daily life and social relationships. Conducted by researchers at Manchester’s Salford Royal Foundation Trust, UK, and funded by Parkinson’s UK, it is the largest study to investigate chronic pain in people with Parkinson’s.

Dr Monty Silverdale, consultant neurologist at Greater Manchester Centre, said: “This study is significant because it shows the important role of genetics in chronic pain in Parkinson’s.

“Our findings suggest that cannabis-based compounds may be worth investigating as a treatment for pain in Parkinson’s.”


Read more: 

 Could playing table tennis help reduce Parkinson’s symptoms?

‘Dopamine-boosting’ BT13 molecule could be used to slow Parkinson’s

Go Back

Share this story

Comments


Related articles


Recipes & Nutrition

Salad with chicken, apple & curry-yogurt dressing

This recipe offers a spicy yet cooling alternative to your standard salad

READ MORE

Perspectives

Who said what: QoTW 11.06.15

Our favourite quotes of the week from around the web

READ MORE
Harry Styles Anne Twist

Carers' Corner

Harry Styles is an “absolutely brilliant” carer for his granddad who has Parkinson’s

One Direction star praised for care of granddad with Parkinson’s

READ MORE