Pig cells implanted into human brain as Parkinson’s treatment

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Author: Parkinson's Life editorsPublished: 21 June 2017

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A new treatment, which involves the implantation of pig cells into a human brain, is being tested as a potential treatment for Parkinson’s.

The therapy, called NTCELL, has been developed by New Zealand-based biotechnology company Living Cell Technologies, and produces factors that promote central nerve system growth and repair nerve degeneration.

Although still in the early stages of testing, the results have been promising with those being treated showing an improvement over an 18-month period.

Roger Barker, professor of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge, said: “The strategy is a good idea. The question is how competitive that will be compared with other cell therapies.”

The treatment could be available as early as 2018.

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