Pig cells implanted into human brain as Parkinson’s treatment

News

Author: Parkinson's Life editorsPublished: 21 June 2017

Parkinson's LifePrep: Parkinson's LifeCook: Parkinson's LifeServes:

News image

A new treatment, which involves the implantation of pig cells into a human brain, is being tested as a potential treatment for Parkinson’s.

The therapy, called NTCELL, has been developed by New Zealand-based biotechnology company Living Cell Technologies, and produces factors that promote central nerve system growth and repair nerve degeneration.

Although still in the early stages of testing, the results have been promising with those being treated showing an improvement over an 18-month period.

Roger Barker, professor of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge, said: “The strategy is a good idea. The question is how competitive that will be compared with other cell therapies.”

The treatment could be available as early as 2018.

Go Back

Share this story

Comments


Related articles


Global update

Comedian Paul Sinha ‘not battling depression’ after Parkinson’s diagnosis

UK quizmaster Paul Sinha responds to claims he is battling depression

READ MORE

Health & Fitness

Meet the 70-year-old who uses boxing to help fight Parkinson’s

Bob Raeburn is hooked on boxing and its benefits

READ MORE
25 years of Trepetlika

Europe

Slovenian Parkinson’s association celebrates 25th birthday in style

25 years of Parkinson’s campaigning in Slovenia

READ MORE