Pesticides could cause Parkinson’s, research finds

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Author: Simge Eva DoganPublished: 20 June 2018

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Pesticides could be linked to Parkinson's

Researchers at a Canadian university have conducted a study that suggests pesticides may lead to Parkinson’s disease.

As part of the study, the team used stem cells from people living with Parkinson’s to ascertain whether exposure to pesticides can cause mutations. The scientists leading the study found that neurons exposed to certain pesticides were low in energy and moved less freely.

Dr Scott Ryan, professor of molecular and cellular biology at the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada, said: “People exposed to these chemicals are at about a 250 per cent higher risk of developing Parkinson’s disease than the rest of the population.”

Despite the results, the guidelines set for pesticides by many official bodies – including the United States Environmental Protection Agency – do not identify these chemicals as risks. The study concluded that safety guidelines for pesticides may need re-evaluation – and that those living in an agricultural environment have a higher risk of developing Parkinson’s.

For a collection of the latest Parkinson’s-related research papers please visit the EPDA website here.

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