Can negative dreams predict long-term cognitive decline in Parkinson’s?

News

Author: Pippa Prendergast-CoatesPublished: 20 August 2020

Parkinson's LifePrep: Parkinson's LifeCook: Parkinson's LifeServes:

woman sleeping in bed

New research has suggested that negative emotions in dreams are associated with a long-term decline in cognitive function in people living with Parkinson’s.

The study, conducted by researchers in Portugal, asked 58 individuals to record a dream diary for a fortnight. Participants were assessed on motor and non-motor symptoms with a cognitive screening tool called the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). After four years, MoCA scores significantly decreased indicating lower cognitive function, particularly in those who had experienced negative emotions while dreaming. This suggests the content of dreams may independently predict cognitive decline long-term.

Researchers say the findings show “a significant, positive and independent association between negative emotions in dreams and a reduction in MoCA scores after four years”, but that the findings should be considered preliminary at this stage due to the small sample size.


Read more:

New machine learning model could help pinpoint stages of Parkinson’s

Can over-the-counter drugs reduce risk of developing genetic Parkinson’s?

Go Back

Share this story

Comments


Related articles


Char and Madi Kennedy smile at each other wearing one of their clothing designs

Interviews

How one family-run clothing company is “sharing the story of Parkinson’s”

Why Shrimp Studio is raising Parkinson’s disease awareness

READ MORE
Escape room by Parkinson's NSW

Global update

No Escape Room: a Parkinson’s campaign like no other

The escape room simulates common Parkinson’s symptoms

READ MORE

sponsored article

Episodes

Podcast: Everyday life after DBS surgery

Our second episode on deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease

READ MORE