“Magnetic” gene in fish may help treat Parkinson’s

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Author: Simge Eva DoganPublished: 30 August 2018

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Researchers at Michigan State University, US, believe the study of a type of catfish could lead to the development of new Parkinson’s treatments.

The scientists discovered that glass catfish have a navigational gene that responds to certain magnetic waves. In a study – published in journal ‘Scientific Reports’ – they injected the gene into mice to control their movements.

Galit Pelled, professor of biomedical engineering, radiology and neuroscience at Michigan State University, and the lead author of the study, said: “We’ve found a non-invasive way to activate this gene once injected in the brain cells of mice and regulate movement in their limbs. It could work similarly in humans. Technology is getting better and better every year, so this magnet could be built into anything.”

It is hoped these latest developments could be used to treat a range of Parkinson’s symptoms such as tremors and mobility problems.

To read more on this topic click here.

For more information on the latest Parkinson’s research please visit Parkinson’s Europe website.

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