Loneliness may increase severity of Parkinson’s disease symptoms

News

Author: Simge Eva DoganPublished: 26 November 2020

Parkinson's LifePrep: Parkinson's LifeCook: Parkinson's LifeServes:

Blonde woman standing by the window, with coffee cup in hands, looking out into the morning light

Researchers in the US have found that people with Parkinson’s disease who experience loneliness may be at an increased risk for severe symptoms related to the condition.

As part of the study – published in the medical journal NPJ Parkinson’s Disease – researchers collected information from 1,500 people with the condition between 2014 to 2019. Those who reported being very lonely were also less likely to exercise regularly and follow a healthy diet – and more likely to experience a lower quality of life.

Dr Indu Subramanian, neurologist and author of the study, said that the team were “surprised” by some of the results and that “one of the most detrimental things is actually being lonely”. The negative impact of loneliness on the severity of Parkinson’s disease symptoms, she added, was as large as the positive impact of exercise.

In light of Covid-19 and the resulting social isolation, the research team sent out a new survey to find out how the pandemic has affected symptoms of people living with Parkinson’s disease.


Read more:

Can tremor predict the effect of Parkinson’s disease medication?

Could a ‘Mediterranean diet’ lower the risk of Parkinson’s for women?

Go Back

Share this story

Comments


Related articles


Ben Stecher

Interviews

World Parkinson Congress: all about the sushi

We talk to Canadian WPC blogger Benjamin Stecher

READ MORE

Advances

Apple says new CareKit platform will ‘empower’ Parkinson’s patients

Open-source platform to transform the way we think about health

READ MORE

Perspectives

6 inspiring TED talks on Parkinson’s disease

Some of the most uplifting presentations given on Parkinson’s

READ MORE