Duodopa rejected for NHS use in Scotland

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Author: Almaz OhenePublished: 11 January 2016

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The advanced Parkinson’s treatment Duodopa has been rejected for routine use on the NHS in Scotland, sparking concerns among charities and health professionals.

The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) said it was unable to approve of Duodopa, due to questions raised over its cost-effectiveness.

Dr Alan MacDonald, vice chairman of SMC, said: “The Committee was unable to accept co-careldopa intestinal gel (Duodopa) for the routine treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease because of uncertainty about the clinical benefits the medicine would provide for this patient group in relation to its cost.”

Duodopa, which can help to control the symptoms of advanced Parkinson’s when all other treatments have stopped working. The gel treatment is administered to the intestine via pump and a tube and requires the patient to undergo surgery – it is estimated to cost around £28,000-per-year per patient and was approved for use by the NHS in England in July 2015.

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