Diesel exhaust fumes may increase the risk of Parkinson’s, study suggests

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Author: Sophie BatesPublished: 28 May 2020

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diesel exhaust fumes

A new study by researchers in the US has found evidence that chemicals in diesel exhaust fumes can damage brain cells – and potentially increase the risk of Parkinson’s.

As part of the study – published in ‘Toxicological Sciences’ – researchers tested the effects of diesel exhaust fumes on zebrafish, as their neurons interact in a similar way to those of humans.

The researchers found that after being exposed to the chemicals, the zebrafish had fewer cells that dispose of toxic build-up of the protein alpha-synuclein, which occurs in Parkinson’s. The researchers replicated the experiment with cultured human cells and found similar results.

Dr Jeff Bronstein, a professor of neurology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), US, said: “Overall, this report shows a plausible mechanism of why air pollution may increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease.”

To read more on this topic click here.

To find out more about the causes of Parkinson’s, visit the EPDA website.


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