Could eating fish prevent Parkinson’s disease?

News

Author: Parkinson's Life editorsPublished: 2 May 2018

Parkinson's LifePrep: Parkinson's LifeCook: Parkinson's LifeServes:

Fresh fish

A new study has found a link between the consumption of fish and long-term neurological health.

The research, carried out by Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, found that Parvalbumin – a protein found in several different types of fish – could prevent the formation of protein structures linked to Parkinson’s disease.

Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede, professor and head of chemical biology at Chalmers University of Technology, said: “Parvalbumin collects up the ‘Parkinson’s protein’ and actually prevents it from aggregating, simply by aggregating itself first.”

Nathalie Scheers, who worked as a researcher on the study, said the time of year may affect the study’s results: “Fish is normally a lot more nutritious at the end of the summer, because of increased metabolic activity. Levels of parvalbumin are much higher in fish after they have had a lot of sun, so it could be worthwhile increasing consumption during autumn.”

For more information on neuroprotection please visit the EPDA website here.

Go Back

Share this story

Comments


Related articles


Health & Fitness

Dance for Parkinson’s: “We believe in the power of dance”

How a virtual dance class is supporting people with Parkinson’s disease

READ MORE
Tom Isaacs tribute

Global update

Watch the global Parkinson’s community pay tribute to Tom Isaacs in music video

VIDEO: ‘Perfect Day’ featuring dozens of people with Parkinson’s

READ MORE

Health & Fitness

Sign up for the World Parkinson Boot Camp this April

Register for the World Parkinson's Boot Camp in Lisbon 9–14 April

READ MORE