Picturing Parkinson’s: scientists capture brain cells in striking detail

Europe

Author: Almaz OhenePublished: 24 November 2016

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a-neuronal-journey

This gallery of stunning photos shows Parkinson’s disease from a microscopic, yet beautiful, perspective


The winning images of the annual ‘Picturing Parkinson’s’ competition have been unveiled. Organised by Parkinson’s UK, the competition is held in memory of scientist Dr Jonathan Stevens, a research supporter who was passionate about making new findings accessible and easy to understand.

The winning photo features a new gene that resembles a desert and is titled ‘The trail of the TIGAR – what lies behind’. The photographer, Karla Robles Lopez of the University of Sheffield, says that the TIGAR gene can be used as a signpost for sporadic Parkinson’s disease – and the related Lewy body dementia – in patients.

Brian Stevens, Jonathan’s father, who judged the entries with his family, said of the winning picture: “We think that the image and its description are the most interesting artistically. It represents a new area of scientific research, which we are sure that Jonny would have been interested in and would have enthusiastically supported.”

The gallery below shows some of the competition’s highlights.

Image credits: Parkinson’s UK


Read more: Scientific art: stunning Parkinson’s photos reveal beauty of the brain 

9 stunning works of art created by people with Parkinson’s

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